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THE ESAN WEEK AS DIFFERENT FROM THE COLONIAL MODEL

THE ESAN WEEK AS DIFFERENT FROM THE COLONIAL MODEL

(With Particular Reference To Ebelle Kingdom)

By

Ehichioya Iruobe

September, 2021.

 

it’s quite interesting and informative to begin to look at the EBELLE variant of the Esan language. It’s rather unfortunate that for now , there is no established and generally accepted  lexicon of the EBELLE dialect of Esan.

 

Generally though, what we’ve had over the years is the attempt at writing the Esan language using the” English language” code: graphological, phonological and  morphologically realisation. And because the Esan language takes bearing from these realisations, linguistic programming cum semantics is largely affected by such romance. It’s therefore a duty for all speakers of the Esan language as first language users to offer a guide bearing in mind that there is no standard Esan language for now. Any attempt to impose any variety will amount to cultural imposition which can spark tribal and civil ramblings . It’s therefore expedient for linguists( with Esan language background) to begin to fashion out  clear cut differences in the various dialects of the Esan language, bearing in mind the graphology and phonology of the dialects.

 

For the issues on the table, I wish to make the following contributions::

 

The days of the week in Esan,( EBELLE ) in focus, were simply five. Precolonial experience recognised five days in a week. Counting of days was from the market day. Therefore, day one was;

1. Edeken( worship day)

2.. Edugbo.( Farm day)

3. Edeki( market day)

4. Edugbo( farm day)

5. Edeken(  worship day.)

 

The seven days counting came with the colonial experience. Irrespective of the days, the _ugbo_ and _eki_ _and eken_ days were the week days.

About Gabriel Iruobe

I have a background in Sociology from the University of Ibadan. Although, an industrial sociologist, my interest in rural societies have grown over the years. The sociological insight gained in my school days have had me define development in a fashion slightly different from an orthodox orientation. Studying or researching on rural life is quite easy for me since I spent my early life in a rural setting, viewing all the attractions often overlooked by the urban elites. If the rule of sustainable development is to be followed, no aspect of the world's cultural heritage is to be ignore or neglected. This is my obsession.

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